Chaire de recherche du Canada en ÉPI

Université Laval

Équipe

Je suis détentrice d'une maîtrise en Sciences Politiques (spécialisation Globalisation et Gouvernance) obtenue à Sciences Po Lyon (France) en avril 2014.

J'ai travaillé pendant deux ans comme coordinatrice de projets environnementaux dans l'organisation non-gouvernementale PIDES, qui s'intéresse de façon générale aux problématiques urbaines et à l'innovation sociale.

Je suis actuellement candidate au doctorat en Science Politique à l'Université Laval (Québec, Canada). Mon projet de thèse porte sur l'étude du changement dans les systèmes complexes et prend pour cas d'étude les réseaux municipaux transnationaux dans la gouvernance climatique mondiale.

Je travaille comme chargée de cours pour le cours Politiques Environnementales et comme auxiliaire d'enseignement pour le cours Fondements du Développement Durable, tous deux offerts par le Département de Science Politique aux étudiants de premier cycle. 

J'ai par ailleurs eu un contrat d'auxiliaire de recherche dans le cadre d'un projet d'ouvrage sur le transport urbain durable piloté par le professeur Jean Mercier. J'ai aussi travaillé avec Geneviève Cloutier, professeure en Etudes urbaines, sur un projet de recherche portant sur les expérimentations locales d'adaptation aux changements climatiques.

En 2016, j'ai reçu deux bourses d'excellence de la part de la Faculté des Sciences Sociales de l'Université Laval, dans le but de participer à différentes formations méthodologiques internationales.

En 2017, j'ai reçu la bourse d'excellence pour étudiants au doctorat attribuée par l'Institut Hydro-Québec en Environnement, Développement et Société. J'ai également reçu la bourse d'excellence au doctorat du Fonds facultaire d'enseignement et de recherche attribuée par la Faculté des Sciences Sociales de l'Université Laval. 

En 2018, j'ai obtenu la bourse de voyage du fonds Jean-Pierre Derriennic et la bourse d'excellence en recherche du Département de Science Politique. J'ai également reçu la bourse de formation au doctorat offerte par le Fonds de Recherche du Québec - Société et Culture pour une durée de deux ans. 

Intérêts de recherche

Politique Internationale de l'Environnement

Politiques environnementales

Réseaux transnationaux de villes

Gouvernance climatique urbaine

Systèmes complexes

Analyse de réseaux sociaux

Cours enseignés

Auxiliaire d'Enseignement pour le Cours DDU-1000 Fondements du Développement Durable

Auxiliaire d'Enseignement pour le Cours POL-1003 Régimes Politiques

Chargée de cours pour le Cours POL-2207 Politiques Environnementales

Projet de recherche en cours

"Discussing the Power of the Network in a Complex System: An Analysis of the Innovation Property of Transnational Municipal Networks in Global Climate Governance"

Dans ce projet de thèse, je m'intéresse aux interactions des réseaux municipaux transnationaux et leur influence sur l'émergence d'innovations dans la gouvernance climatique mondiale. Je regarde plus particulièrement les innovations dans les instruments de gouvernance utilisés par les réseaux municipaux transnationaux. 

Articles scientifiques

Communications avec arbitrage

  • Papin-Manjarrez, M., "The Rise of Transnational Municipal Networks, a Promise of Innovation for Adaptation Governance?", May 23, 2017, Stockholm Environment Institute, Sweden.


    Transnational adaptation governance has greatly evolved recently, but studies on this issue
    remain scarce. In this paper, I focus on one factor of its increasing complexity, the rise of new
    and diverse actors. More specifically, I discuss the innovation role of transnational municipal
    networks (TMNs), alliances of cities that seek to develop their climate action, and reflect on
    its effects on global adaptation governance.
    TMNs are an interesting object of analysis for various reasons. First, few TMNs work
    exclusively on adaptation and consequently, there have been few studies on that matter.
    However, TMNs do indirectly tackle adaptation and see it as a concern that goes beyond
    climate and embraces a broader global change. Furthermore, they depart from international
    actors by connecting local actors to public, private, local and transnational partners; their
    influence on climate governance should therefore be studied. Finally, TMNs are seen as
    innovative, although this lacks precision. If they indeed produce innovation, what do they do
    that is different and novel and what is their effect on global adaptation governance?
    In order to start answering this question, I elaborate a theoretical framework based on
    complexity theory and the study of policy instruments that helps understand the emergence of
    innovation and its effects. I then draw a case study of 100 Resilient Cities and find that the
    governance tools it uses, partly because of their focus on nodality and organization, are
    indeed innovative. The TMN’s numerous and diverse partnerships may furthermore enable
    the diffusion of these tools in the global adaptation governance system. Overall, this paper
    seeks to better understand the role of TMNs as we are witnessing their growing influence and
    reflect on the possible outcomes in global adaptation governance regarding its strengthening
    and development.

  • Papin-Manjarrez, M., "Understanding innovation in a change-averse system: The rise of Transnational Municipal Networks in Global Climate Governance", May 17, 2017, Heidelberg, Germany.


    In this paper, I analyse the rise and impact of Transnational Municipal Networks (TMNs) in
    the evolving global climate governance through the study of 100 Resilient Cities (100RC).
    The contrasting outcomes of COP15 and COP21 have revealed a shift from a top-down to a
    more bottom-up approach in global climate governance. Accordingly, cities are becoming
    more influential, which is mainly linked to their membership in TMNs, alliances they create
    to develop and promote their climate action. In a change-averse system, how have TMNs
    become influential actors of global climate governance, taking cities with them? In this paper,
    I argue that TMNs have gained influence through their networking strategy and the creation
    of innovative governance instruments.
    Using network theory and policy instrument studies, I draw a novel in-depth study of 100RC,
    a prominent TMN gathering 100 city members, and generate a robust preliminary answer.
    The TMN’s explicit goal of becoming influential beyond the limits of its network of cities
    and its numerous connections to a wide variety of actors make it a stimulating case for
    research. I thus observe the strategy used by the TMN to develop and gain influence,
    focusing on its interactions with other TMNs and distinct actors and on the innovative
    instruments it uses to steer its members. Finally, I offer some hypotheses on the role of TMNs
    in global climate governance.
    This paper contributes to the literature on global climate governance by studying a specific
    element of the broad category of non-state actors to understand how it has taken part in the
    current shift towards a new governing of climate change. By focusing on its innovation role,
    it fits INOGOV aims and goals.

Conférences, séminaires et ateliers

  • Papin-Manjarrez, M., 2018, “Understanding change in a complex system: The innovation property of Transnational Municipal Networks”, April 5, International Studies Association Annual Convention, San Francisco, United States.


    Despite the global call for action, international actors have seemed unable to provide effective solutions to the ‘wicked problem’ of climate change. Overall, the global climate
    governance system initiated at the end of the 1980s has hardly evolved and is often described as locked. Recently, however, distinct actors have started to offer new answers to the governing of climate. Among them, Transnational Municipal Networks (TMNs) claim that ‘while nations talk, cities act’ and promote the role of local actors at the global level. Although their direct effect on mitigation has been questioned, I argue that TMNs may have an indirect effect on the system through the creation of governance tools of new generation. This paper thus tackles the general question of how a system may change.
    In that sense, I use a theoretical framework based on complexity approaches and network theory that gives an understanding of the emergence and diffusion of innovation. I
    then conduct a case study of 100 Resilient Cities, a recent TMN that has rapidly become a central actor within the network of TMNs. Finally, I present some prospects of the emergence of these actors that lack legal authority and financial resources in global climate governance.


  • Papin-Manjarrez, M., 2018, “Structures and actors: the elaborated strategy of Transnational Municipal Networks to influence global climate governance”, April 4, International Studies Association Annual Convention, San Francisco, United States. 


    Over the last decades, the interest in networks in International Relations has dramatically increased. Witnessing a variety of transnational processes in world politics, scholars have studied epistemic communities, transnational advocacy networks or intergovernmental policy networks, among others. Recently, they have also applied the network lens to global climate governance, looking at different entities as structures or as actors. However, few studies have analysed them as both. This paper argues that networks can be seen simultaneously as constraining structures and purposeful and influential agents. In that sense, the case of Transnational Municipal Networks (TMNs) engaged in climate action proves interesting. As structures, TMNs successfully connect cities together and with other actors in complex arrangements where power logics are at play. As actors, they also develop strategies to reach and influence distinct international and transnational actors. The example of 100 Resilient Cities shows these processes result from well-thought strategies aimed at influencing global climate governance. It also underlines how the network as a whole affects its members which in turn shape it through their decisions and actions. Entering the agent-structure debate in an innovative way, this paper overall seeks to engage in a fruitful reflection on networks in IR.


  • Papin-Manjarrez, M., 2018, La place des villes dans la gouvernance climatique mondiale, Table Ronde intitulée "COP23: Regards croisés sur les négociations climatiques", 8 février, Université Laval, Québec. 


    Lors de cette table ronde intitulée "COP23: Regards Croisés sur les négociations climatiques2 organisée par l'Institut Hydro-Québec en Environnement, Développement et Société, j'ai évoqué le rôle des villes dans la gouvernance climatique mondiale. Plus spécifiquement, j'ai évoqué la présence et les objectifs des réseaux municipaux transnationaux aux Conférences des Parties organisées par la Convention-Cadre des Nations Unies sur les Changements Climatiques. J'ai aussi mis en avant le rôle des autres acteurs non-étatiques lors de ces négociations et le déroulement de ces dernières dans ses espaces officiels et non-officiels. 


  • Papin-Manjarrez, M., 2017, “Going beyond the buzzword to make the most of institutional complexity”, 30 novembre, Centre for Global Cooperation Research, Duisburg. 


    A variety of studies on global governance, whether they are built on theories of multilevel governance, regime complexes or organisational ecology, increasingly refer to the phrase “institutional complexity”. Doing so, they usually recognise the increasing number of institutions in global governance, their diversity and their interdependence. Overall, they seek to make sense of a system which is harder and harder to explain and predict. However, most of the time, the term complexity is used as a buzzword that lacks fundamental principles lying behind the concept as applied in several theoretical approaches. Complex issues are just seen as complicated ones. In these cases, talking about institutional complexity does not add to the study of global governance. However, it could and thus should. How can “institutional complexity” contribute to our
    understanding and eventually to our practice of global governance?
    This think-piece argues that we need to go beyond the phrase and go back to theory to make the most of “institutional complexity”. Integrating principles from the literature on complex systems, we can build a powerful analytical concept. To this end, this work proposes a preliminary three-level definition of institutional complexity based on complex systems thinking. More specifically, it builds on features of the complex system such as interconnectedness of its elements, nonlinearity and feedback loops, and openness. In what regards its properties, self-organisation, adaptability and unpredictability, are also considered. This leads to a structuring of the concept around a basic, a secondary and an indicator levels. A discussion of this effort then follows. Its main goal is to underscore the potential of the concept of institutional complexity for making several contributions to the study of global governance. On the theoretical side, this preliminary definition may encourage the elaboration of more structured theories of change in the current global governance system. Epistemologically, it could help us move away from our prediction goals and embrace uncertainty by focusing on the construction of plausible scenarios. These may later facilitate our policy interventions. Finally, regarding methodology, an analytical definition of institutional complexity may facilitate our using appropriate methods that most particularly focus on causal complexity and interconnections. This work is only a preliminary reflection but it hopes to foster new ideas on the way to analyse and understand institutional complexity.


  • Papin-Manjarrez, M., 2017, “The innovation property of Transnational Municipal Networks: prospects for the complex system of global climate governance”, 10 octobre, Lund University, Lund.

     


    This paper analyses the innovation property of Transnational Municipal Networks (TMNs) to understand how it may affect global climate governance and to question the prospects for the allocation and access to climate governance benefits and burdens.
    Global climate governance has traditionally been led by the most powerful actors of the system, i.e. Western industrialized states and intergovernmental organisations that have set the norms ruling the governing of climate. However, as COP21 underlined, other actors are now participating in these issues, such as cities, often represented by TMNs. The rise of TMNs, alliances cities join voluntarily to exchange on a variety of urban issues, learn and implement best practices, and be represented globally, has triggered the interest of scholars. Some have shown that TMNs enable cities to act as technical and normative leaders on the global climate scene. Others have emphasized their role in promoting and encouraging local climate action and providing cities with informational, financial and political resources. Finally, studies have underscored their ability to produce innovation in climate governance, fostering a reflection on who governs and how. As they combine institutional and market-based elements to elaborate actions, TMNs are also said to generate a new system of governance from the middle.
    However, innovation and its effects still need to be clearly defined and traced. Acknowledging this innovation property, we must precise what it is that TMNs do differently
    from states. Is it their climate action, their practice of governance or the set of norms they diffuse that is innovative? And how does it rise and diffuse in climate governance? To start answering these questions, I use a theoretical framework based on complexity thinking as it brings interesting inputs to explain the emergence and diffusion of innovation. Through a case study and network analysis of 100 Resilient Cities focusing on the instruments it uses and the interactions it has with its member cities and its partners, I observe how innovation rises from the TMN and how it may possibly diffuse in the complex system of global climate governance. This type of empirical study, which analyses the interactions of TMNs, has, to my knowledge, rarely been done, which makes this paper an interesting contribution to studies on TMNs. On a more general level, this work may help us understand if TMNs, as new actors of global climate governance with the potential to affect its current functioning, may be able to reallocate its benefits and burdens.

  • Papin-Manjarrez, M., "The innovative instruments of transnational municipal networks in the complex system of climate governance", May 19, 2017, Utrecht University, Netherlands. 


    In this working paper, I analyse Transnational Municipal Networks (TMNs) as elements of the complex system of climate governance and assess their potential for innovation through the study of their governance instruments. Over the recent period, climate governance has experienced the rise of sub-state and non-state actors. Among them, TMNs, alliances cities create and or integrate to develop their climate action and be represented at the global scale, have received a lot of attention. Scholars have underlined their role in promoting local climate action and providing cities with cognitive, financial and political resources. They have also claimed their ability to bring innovation to climate governance by questioning who governs and how. Others imply that by combining institutional and market-based elements to elaborate and implement their actions, they generate a new system of governance from the middle. However, these efforts to examine the innovation role of TMNs need to be strengthened, considering the increasing complexity of the environment. More specifically, we must understand what TMNs do differently and how they may manage to change practices in the complex system of climate governance. To this end, this paper focuses on the governance instruments used by TMNs to steer their members towards climate action. Whereas states and intergovernmental organizations usually recur to regulatory and economic instruments, displaying a traditional vision of authority, TMNs seem to favour instruments based on nodal and organizational resources. In that sense, their steering would be softer and more indirect. The prospects of this innovation are then discussed to understand whether it might represent an effective alternative to the current managing of climate issues. Envisioning climate governance itself as a complex system, this paper analyses how change may emerge and diffuse in nonlinear ways to challenge dominant modes of governing. It will thus represent an interesting contribution to the discussion of the diverse strategies for effective environmental governance.


    Voir la publication originale en format pdf

  • Papin-Manjarrez, M., "The Rise of Transnational Municipal Networks, a Promise of Innovation for Global Climate Governance?", Open Universiteit, Heerlen, March 31, 2017. 


    In this paper, I discuss the innovation role of Transnational Municipal Networks (TMNs) in
    climate governance through the study of 100 Resilient Cities, a TMN focusing on adaptation
    and resilience issues.
    Over the recent period, climate governance has experienced the rise of sub-state and non-state
    actors. Among them, TMNs, alliances of cities created voluntarily by them to develop their
    climate action and be represented at the global scale, have received a lot of attention.
    Scholars have underlined their role in promoting and encouraging local climate action and
    providing cities with cognitive, financial and political resources. They have also claimed their
    ability to bring innovation to climate governance as their influence brings along the
    questioning of who governs and how, as well as the rethinking of the distinction between the
    national and the international. Furthermore, by combining both institutional and market-based
    elements to elaborate and implement actions, they generate a new system of governance from
    the middle.
    However, a lack of precision remains regarding the concept of innovation in global climate
    governance and its application to TMNs. Sometimes seen as diffusion or as experimentation,
    its use demands further theorizing. If TMNs are indeed innovative, what do they do that is
    different and how? This study seeks to clarify the definition of innovation as well as assess
    the innovative role of TMNs and hypothesize the prospects for global climate governance. To
    do so, I draw a case study of 100 Resilient Cities, a TMN that seems to be developing novel
    practices to promote climate adaptation and resilience. Using complexity thinking and
    network theory, I will examine its governance instruments and assess their innovative value.
    By observing the interactions of the TMN with other actors, I will propose an explanation for
    the way innovation emerges from this TMN. My hypothesis is that the diversity and high
    number of partners of the TMN are significant in its developing innovative governance
    instruments promoting adaptation and resilience. I will then draw some conclusions regarding
    global climate governance.
    This paper fits with the goals of the INOGOV Spring School as it studies an emerging actor
    of transnational climate governance and focuses on its innovative potential. It will thus
    represent an interesting contribution to discussions on both theoretical and practical aspects
    of climate governance.

Documents de vulgarisation

Interventions dans les médias